riotsiren:

Next older person to complain about millennials has to pay off a random 20-something’s student loans

(Reblogged from lifizafay)

praxis89:

Orange in his Hand

I see two men sweat
at the exit
of the freeway.

One is brown and burnt
from the sun rays
the other is white
with an American Flag
stitched across his trucker hat.

They both wear dirty clothes.
They both burn
to hold
a little green.

One sells oranges, walking up
and down the street.
One holds a sign that reads,
“I’m hungry, help me eat.”
I feel for both of them,
but I only admire one.

The one who hands
oranges in bags to tired faces,
who chases cars
for his change,
who counts pennies
as profit
to keep his apartment.

The one whose wife wakes
before sunrise to walk
through Los Angeles streets
yelling “tamales, tamales”
with a 4 year old daughter
at her side.

The mother who crossed over
4 years earlier so her daughter
wouldn’t have to sell tamales
with a baby at her side.

The father tells his son
never to beg,
but to work hard for the bread.
So the son sells Cheetos
at his high school
and gets called beaner
for not owning
named brand clothes.
A son who must bring dollars
before good grades
because rent is two weeks late.
A son who will one day hold
a gun to the head
of a liquor store clerk,
only to remember
his father’s words.

Mijo, work hard for the bread.

Rent is two weeks late
so the family
breaks tax laws to make jobs
and they lifts roses to the sky
hoping someone passing by
is falling in love again,
so the family
takes elotes
to the neighborhood projects
hoping the ninos are hungry.

The news says this family is here
to take my job,
my seat in school,
my country,
but the only thing they’re taking
is the risk
of being handcuffed,
broken and deported
in the name of family
in the name of love
in the name of trying
everything to stay above
the current
and that is why
I can’t help

But to admire the man
with an orange in his hand,
a fireball of hunger in his palm.

(Reblogged from lifizafay)

biglittleprincess:

Shout out to all of the brown girls whose first time shaving wasn’t a joyful step into womanhood, but an occasion marked by the shame and grief of coming home from school and begging your mom to let you do it because the kids at school wouldn’t stop pointing and laughing

(Reblogged from benditlikebeckhamsadnessblog)

bloodwort:

frusturbation:

janefondle:

xpsycho:

eatimitationcrab:

setbabiesonfire:

Sgt. Thomas McVicar of the Jersey City Police Department shot 22 year old Kwadir Felton, leaving him blind, after Kwadir pulled a gun on him, he claims. Kwadir Felton denied the accusation, stating that he doesn’t even carry guns.

"I don’t understand!" Felton yelled at a police officer before his mother was removed from the courtroom. "You didn’t have to shoot me in the head for no reason! You trying to charge me with something I didn’t do!"

Sign the Change.org petition and get this story out there.

SIGN THE PETITION. Still at least 1,000 signatures needed. SIGNAL BOOST THIS or i will judge you.

This post has 140k notes, yet the change.org petition only has 44k. Sign the damn petition! 

This broke my fucking heart.

hey this needs about 16k more signatures

(Source: nj.com)

(Reblogged from kasuchi)

micdotcom:

Forget the spreadsheet, here’s an easy flowchart to know if a women owes you sex

Microsoft Excel took a turn for the explicit this week when the Internet learned the once-innocuous office tool was being used in a dispiriting new bro-trend: using the software to track of the number of times their partners refuse sex. Yes, #sexspreadsheets are a thing, presumably because some men still believe that owning of a penis entitles them to unlimited sexy times.

Sorry, guys, that’s just not the way the world works | Follow micdotcom 

(Reblogged from blackmagicalgirlmisandry)
explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.
Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.
Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.
Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.
The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

explore-blog:

Ann Friedman's Disapproval Matrix for handling criticism is a thing of genius, not to mention essential internet-age literacy. She explains:

Critics: These are smart people who know something about your field. They are taking a hard look at your work and are not loving it. You’ll probably want to listen to what they have to say, and make some adjustments to your work based on their thoughtful comments.

Lovers: These people are invested in you and are also giving you negative but rational feedback because they want you to improve. Listen to them, too.

Frenemies: Ooooh, this quadrant is tricky. These people really know how to hurt you, because they know you personally or know your work pretty well. But at the end of the day, their criticism is not actually about your work—it’s about you personally. And they aren’t actually interested in a productive conversation that will result in you becoming better at what you do. They just wanna undermine you. Dishonorable mention goes to The Hater Within, aka the irrational voice inside you that says you suck, which usually falls into this quadrant. Tell all of these fools to sit down and shut up.

Haters: This is your garden-variety, often anonymous troll who wants to tear down everything about you for no rational reason. Folks in this quadrant are easy to write off because they’re counterproductive and you don’t even know them. Ignore! Engaging won’t make you any better at what you do. And then rest easy, because having haters is proof your work is finding a wide audience and is sparking conversation. Own it.

The general rule of thumb? When you receive negative feedback that falls into one of the top two quadrants—from experts or people who care about you who are engaging with and rationally critiquing your work—you should probably take their comments to heart. When you receive negative feedback that falls into the bottom two quadrants, you should just let it roll off your back and just keep doin’ you.

Complement with Benjamin Franklin’s trick for neutralizing critics, Daniel Dennett on how to criticize with kindness, and Anne Lamott’s definitive manifesto for handling haters.

(Reblogged from explore-blog)

drag0n-r0ad:

 

directorlazard:

rapeculturerealities:

fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

sweetsugaryshock:

beben-eleben:

For future reference.

Thank you.

For those who would ever need it. -C

reblogging here because i can see this being relevant to anyone who’s ever tried to get out of an abusive relationship

Reblogging because that last comment made me reread the whole thing in a new light and realize this could be vital information. So, putting it out there for everyone, and hoping no one ever really needs it.

(Reblogged from condemnantquodnonintelligunt)

(Source: bodyrock)

(Reblogged from blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

msdeonb:

blackgeologist:

Never get involved with a person whose family treats you bad.

Preach. Neva again

(Reblogged from navigatethestream)

deputychairman:

usedusernames:

raideo:

epicukulelesolo:

sageofmagic:

memegrandpa:

helbows:

Introducing the Social Intelligence Test! From what I can tell, it’s sponsored by Harvard and it’s rather interesting. The basis is you look at pictures of people going through different emotions and decide what emotion they’re feeling. The trick is, you can only see their eyes.

How well can you read people? I never thought I was good at it, but I scored rather high on this test. It was a very interesting experience! I highly recommend taking this!

13 out of 36…

28 out of 36

31 our of 36 …holy crap

30 out of 36 woah…

would have gotten 31 if I hadnt fucked one up, I meant to click a different option.  Since I have a horrible time making eye contact or looking at people’s faces this doesn’t mean I can read people well in practice, but this is interesting.

i scored averagely which is impressive enough to me cuz i got picked on just this week for not reading people well lol

Alright but in what real life situation do you EVER have to guess a person’s emotions with no context and only seeing their eyes? If you’re a very specialised kind of optician, maybe? And how do we KNOW they were feeling what the thing says they were feeling? Sometimes I do pretend-angry with my kids because they’ve done a naughty thing that I really don’t want them to do again, but actually it’s funny so my face is trying to say “disapproving” but really I’m amused? Or the opposite, when your boss tells a vulgar joke and everyone laughs so you make your face say “amused” but what you really think is “you’re a lecherous old man”???? And don’t tell me people can spot that, everyone in the world would have been sacked by now if their boss really knew how they felt.

(Reblogged from deputychairman)